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Multi-system Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)


You may be aware of recent reporting on this syndrome, as news outlets have been doing many stories about it.  There are a few things we want you to be aware of:

  1. It’s extremely rare, even in children who have been sick with or infected with coronavirus
  2. It seems to be associated with COVID-19, though it may not be directly due to acute infection.  It is occurring weeks after exposure or other COVID-related symptoms
  3. It is associated with persisting high fevers and, variably,  rashes, red eyes, severe abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea, lethargy, confusion and breathing problems
  4. These are extremely ill children.  So, don’t worry about your child having it if your child has mild illness – for instance, 1-2 days of mild nausea with vomiting and diarrhea, mild rash, and fevers <102. If your child appears only mildly ill then it is unlikely to be MIS-C and likely to be something else.  

Again, while there has been a large amount of media attention and it sounds very frightening, it is very rare. The first cases of MIS-C in Colorado have now been identified (5/20/20). We are doing our best to be up-to-date on this topic and all related COVID19 topics, so continue to seek out expert advice from our colleagues at Children’s Hospital of Colorado.

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